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Mar
24
2011

You Don’t Know Jack Review

– Scott Ellison

Our Score: 4 / 5 – Awesome

You don’t know jack, and neither do I – still, after all these years. That is of course, you’re the type who game the game until you remember all the answers to the questions. There is a hiccup with that idea though, there are 730 questions total in the game. Each episode has 10 questions and 73 episodes in total (excluding DLC that is now out). The humor-infused to the basic trivia game format is the bread and butter of this long-running, formerly PC-only series. The host this time is Cookie Masterson, asking you all the questions and getting himself side-tracked all along the way with anecdotes and cheesy jokes.

You start by giving yourself a name or letting the game come up with something for you. The latter’s results can be extremely amusing. Then you begin the game. Round 1 consists of 5 questions, then an intermission of Dis Or Dat, where you are in a lightning round to choose between two answers instead of the normal four. Then Round 2 starts with x2 multiplier bonus running for the final 5 questions. Then at the end is the Jack Attack, where you must match relating words for bonus money – either to catch up or fall further behind.

A new feature in the game, is the introduction of the “SCREW”. During a round if you’re confident you know an answer and a certain opponent does not. You can screw them and they have 5 seconds to answer the question, they get it wrong, and you get it right – you get bonus money. You misjudge and they get it right, you get screwed. It’s neat and beneficial to change the tides in your favor when the right question appears. There are bonus “Wrong Answer of the Game” where if you get a certain question in one game (episode) wrong, with the correct wrong answer – you unlock a commercial and bonus cash for finding it.

You Don’t Know Jack is a fantastic party game offline and on. Even in short, solo bursts. Answering all 730 questions and completing all 73 episodes will take time, there is great value there. However, the game’s shortcomings occur once you become familiar with the answers. It will either bore you or annoy you, especially if you’re on the receiving end of a know-it-all dominating the game. I send a mixed message here, but this is definitely something you shouldn’t pass up regardless of it’s replayability over time.

Retails for: $29.99, recommended purchase price: $17.99

*NOTE: The PC version of You Don’t Know Jack is $19.99 due to lack of online multiplayer.

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